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Housing was a key issue identified by voters in the 2019 general election and one of the most common casework enquiries for MPs' offices. Here are the answers to some of the frequently asked social housing questions.

  • How do I deal with anti-social behaviour?

    How do I deal with anti-social behaviour?

    Antisocial behaviour (ASB) – from noisy pets to drug use and gun and knife crime – can make people’s lives a misery. In the first instance, we advise trying to resolve issues with neighbours directly, if residents feel safe to do so, before making a formal complaint.

    Housing associations have lots of online advice, such as ASB toolkits to help tenants deal with, and report, ASB.

  • Who carries out repairs to my home?

    Who carries out repairs to my home?

    Housing associations typically have to maintain and repair the structural elements and outside of buildings (including doors and windows) and any communal areas, as well as the heating and electrics of individual homes.

    Tenants maintain internal decoration, make minor repairs, clear blockages in waste pipes and look after their garden. Most housing associations have online repairs guides setting out responsibilities and explaining how to report repairs.

  • Can I get disability aids and adaptations made to my home?

    Can I get disability aids and adaptations made to my home?

    Aids and adaptations are alterations to make homes easier to live in, enabling residents to live independently for longer in their homes. Alterations, which could be anything from fitting lever taps to installing a stair lift, are available to tenants meeting eligibility criteria.

  • What are my responsibilities as a tenant?

    What are my responsibilities as a tenant?

    Tenants’ rights and responsibilities, as well as the responsibilities of the housing association, are set out in their tenancy agreement. Responsibilities include: paying rent; allowing access for safety checks and repairs; not causing a nuisance to neighbours; and keeping homes in clean and good condition. Our tenancy management guide gives the answers to tenants’ most common questions.

  • My home is no longer suitable for me and my family, what can I do?

    My home is no longer suitable for me and my family, what can I do?

    Mutual exchanges are a great way for two or more tenants to swap their homes and is often faster than applying for a transfer. Each tenant moves into their exchange partner’s home and takes on responsibility for that tenancy. Tenants may exchange to a larger or smaller home or move to another part of the country, if they find someone with whom to swap. Mutual exchanges are typically available to people with a secure, assured lifetime or five year fixed-term social housing tenancy.